• Free Community College Would Help Low Income Students Graduation

    Free College Plan Would Help Low-Income Students

    The average out of pocket cost facing community college students from low-income families ranges from $8,000-$11,000 per year. That is after all grant aid is taken into account, and it represents the amount that students must borrow and earn in order to make college possible. The situation facing moderate-income families is not much better—and they are often in a more difficult situation since they have little disposable income and yet cannot access the federal Pell Grant.

    Read more »
  • NYC To Reform School Discipline Rules (art by Andre Minduka)

    NYC To Reform Rules for Restraining, Suspending Students

    New York City’s new regulations would require school safety agents to file monthly reports with the mayor’s office on the use of restraints. It would also aim to reduce schools’ reliance on 911 calls to manage disruptive students. The city’s education department plans to give de-escalation training to more than 1,500 educators across the city.

    Read more »
  • Numerous NYC officials busted in massive bribery scheme that expedited the construction of buildings in exchange for cash and gifts. Photo via v1ctor/Flickr/CC

    Building Inspection Bribery Bust Nets Dozens

    Earlier today Manhattan DA Cy Vance announced a massive bust in a bribery scheme that moved money to dirty city officials in exchange for a whole slew of services that

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  • Art via  Net Alloy - CC Open Clip Art   http://www.netalloy.com

    A Sheldon Silver Mystery: Did He Betray New York Renters?

    The bribery case against Silver unveiled by prosecutors last week raises questions about whether Silver pulled his punches in negotiations on that 2011 bill, potentially at the expense of hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers who live in rent stabilized apartments.

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Free Community College Would Help Low Income Students Graduation

Free College Plan Would Help Low-Income Students

The average out of pocket cost facing community college students from low-income families ranges from $8,000-$11,000 per year. That is after all grant aid is taken into account, and it represents the amount that students must borrow and earn in order to make college possible. The situation facing moderate-income families is not much better—and they are often in a more difficult situation since they have little disposable income and yet cannot access the federal Pell Grant.

Free College Plan Would Help Low-Income Students

Free Community College Would Help Low Income Students Graduation

The average out of pocket cost facing community college students from low-income families ranges from $8,000-$11,000 per year. That is after all grant aid is taken into account, and it represents the amount that students must borrow and earn in order to make college possible. The situation facing moderate-income families is not much better—and they are often in a more difficult situation since they have little disposable income and yet cannot access the federal Pell Grant.

Read more

NYC To Reform Rules for Restraining, Suspending Students

NYC To Reform School Discipline Rules (art by Andre Minduka)

New York City’s new regulations would require school safety agents to file monthly reports with the mayor’s office on the use of restraints. It would also aim to reduce schools’ reliance on 911 calls to manage disruptive students. The city’s education department plans to give de-escalation training to more than 1,500 educators across the city.

Read more

What’s Brewing? This Week’s Must Read Link Roundup

what's brewing

Evidence has come to light of a decades long coverup of sexual abuse, harassment, and corruption at St. Frances Preparatory School. Allegations run the gamut from hiring a convicted thief as its financial controller, to physical and sexual harassment, to the horrific allegations of sexual and physical abuse. – For a segment of New York City’s homeless population, the traditional

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For Nonprofit Hospitals Who Sue Patients, New Rules

Nonprofit hospitals get big tax breaks for providing care for patients who can’t afford it. Under new IRS rules these hospitals must take extra steps to inform poor patients they may qualify for financial assistance.

Hospitals that don’t take these steps before suing patients could face the ultimate penalty of losing their tax-exempt status. That sounds clear enough. But the first catch is that the IRS does not have a history of aggressive enforcement. Last month, ProPublica and NPR detailed how one nonprofit hospital in Missouri sued thousands of lower income workers who couldn’t pay

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